Loss of brakes cited in Florida plane crash 2019 Federal Aviation Administration National Transportation Safety Board Boeing Department of Defense

Investigators could not predict the poor runway conditions and soggy pilots. Pentagon Slide to Florida The river two years ago.

NS National Transportation Safety Board As the Boeing 737 landed at Jacksonville Naval Air Force Base on May 3, 2019, Miami Air pilots said the landing was too fast and it took too long to deploy the panel of deceleration.

Even without these errors, investigators said the plane could not be stopped on a runway without a ditch because of the puddle. They said in a report released Wednesday that Miami Air had failed to give pilots proper advice to assess the braking condition of wet runways.

Investigators provided a good estimate of the conditions that “would have prevented (the pilots) from attempting to land”.

Two months after the crash, the Federal Aviation Administration issued a safety warning to reinforce guidelines for landing on a ditch-free runway in moderate to heavy rain.

The Miami Airjet flew over the water from the runway and was caught in the shallow waters of the St. Johns River. Neither the 143 passengers nor the crew were seriously injured, but several pets in the cargo hold were killed.

The plane was carrying Pentagon personnel to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

As the Boeing 737 approached the Navy air base, the pilot spoke to the air traffic controller about the storm. According to the report, when the aircraft descended, the captain was unable to adjust the speed brakes (movable wing panels that produce drag) as required by the landing checklist.

After touchdown, the captain activated one of the engine thrust reversers, but did not feel the aircraft slowing down. The speed brakes acted automatically, but the report said it was seconds later than if the captain had manually adjusted it.

The aircraft drifted to the right, left the end of the runway, struck a dike, starved in the water, and came to a stop in the river.

The NTSB said the excessive speed and the delay in using the speedbrakes “contributed to the severity of the crash.” However, investigators calculated that the plane could not have stopped on the runway anyway due to the puddle.

According to the report, the pilot stopped landing and missed “some clues” that likely would have landed elsewhere.

However, investigators said the flight was delayed and the pilot may have been pressured to complete the flight. They added that the co-pilot’s inexperience (the Boeing 737 had only 18 hours of flight time) could have overloaded the captain.

After the plane stopped in the river, the crew began an emergency evacuation in the dark and it rained. A cellphone video showed the crew and passengers awkwardly walking on the wings of an airplane, and a man carrying a toddler walking in front of people wearing life jackets.

Miami Air filed for bankruptcy last year, claiming its financial problems were a direct result of the coronavirus pandemic that destroyed air travel.

Loss of brakes cited in Florida plane crash 2019 Federal Aviation Administration National Transportation Safety Board Boeing Department of Defense

Source link Loss of brakes cited in Florida plane incident 2019 Federal Aviation Administration National Transportation Safety Board Boeing Department of Defense


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