Airport – Viventing Online Marketing http://viventingonlinemarketing.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 07:52:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T191740.045.png Airport – Viventing Online Marketing http://viventingonlinemarketing.com/ 32 32 Why a Texas Airport Uses Blue Lights in Air Conditioning – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/why-a-texas-airport-uses-blue-lights-in-air-conditioning-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 06:36:17 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/why-a-texas-airport-uses-blue-lights-in-air-conditioning-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ DFW International Airport has completed the installation of a $9 million air filtration system it says uses blue light to kill germs and improve air quality. Khaled Naja, the airport’s executive vice president for infrastructure and development, said the system is unique. “Other airports have used it,” Naja said. “This is the first time an […]]]>

DFW International Airport has completed the installation of a $9 million air filtration system it says uses blue light to kill germs and improve air quality.

Khaled Naja, the airport’s executive vice president for infrastructure and development, said the system is unique.

“Other airports have used it,” Naja said. “This is the first time an airport facility has used it across all airport facilities.”

It is in place in every airport building – in all 933 air units.

“It’s on. It’s on all the time,” Naja said. “Air is circulated five to seven times per hour through the system and as it circulates it is simply zapped so that any pathogens are gone.”

It took two years to install the blue lights, which are also in place in some changing cabins.

“Oh that’s good,” Dallas mom Natalee Allen said as she changed the diapers of her 14-month-old daughter, Beatrice.

Between each use, the blue light sanitizes the flip-top table so it’s clean for the next customer.

The Allens were heading to Utah to visiting family for the holidays.

“I think a lot of people might be nervous about starting to travel again after COVID, so it’s good to know they’re putting measures in place to keep it safe and clean for everyone,” Allen said. .

Naja said he was proud of the project.

“Most people have no idea of ​​our innovation record,” he said. “But what we do is we do all of this behind the scenes and we do it to take care of our customers.”

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Airport Electrification and Inflation Reduction Act 2022 | Greenberg PC Flaster https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/airport-electrification-and-inflation-reduction-act-2022-greenberg-pc-flaster/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 23:23:36 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/airport-electrification-and-inflation-reduction-act-2022-greenberg-pc-flaster/ We have about 90 to 120 days left before regulations are likely to be enacted under the Cut Inflation Act 2022, including regulations relating to renewable energy provisions. These regulations should include guidance on the implementation of the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) and the Production Tax Credit (PTC) for renewable energy, as well as the […]]]>

We have about 90 to 120 days left before regulations are likely to be enacted under the Cut Inflation Act 2022, including regulations relating to renewable energy provisions. These regulations should include guidance on the implementation of the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) and the Production Tax Credit (PTC) for renewable energy, as well as the direct payment option for tax-exempt entities (which make up the bulk of our commercial airport sponsors).

The direct payment option would allow tax-exempt entities to receive a check from the IRS for the amount of the tax credit that would have been applicable if the party claiming the credit had actually been subject to tax. This will make it more economically feasible for airport sponsors to act as their own developer when it comes to solar and other renewable energy projects. However, it is not because the airport sponsors BOX acting as their own developer doesn’t necessarily mean they should. As with any development project, there will remain risks, both obvious and potentially hidden, that will need to be assessed. Among these risks will be the determination of the amount that the system owner can claim as tax base for the purposes of claiming the tax credit for the direct payment option. If an airport developer pursues its own development, there will be many questions about the costs and allocation of costs that can be included in the tax base. One of the changes to the Inflation Reduction Act was to allow interconnection costs to be included, but many other potential pitfalls exist.

Alternatively, an airport sponsor may be able to negotiate an agreement with a solar developer in which, for a development fee, the developer will develop the project, request and obtain the interconnection, and hand over the finished project to the sponsor. The fees negotiated and at arm’s length with the promoter could then be claimed as the tax base for the project.

There are many other difficult questions that need to be considered when deciding on airport energy projects, both renewable and traditional. Airport sponsors must ensure that they take the time and care necessary to ensure the success of each project, both from a financial and energy point of view.

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City touts airport accomplishments, considering additional staff | New https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/city-touts-airport-accomplishments-considering-additional-staff-new/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:43:00 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/city-touts-airport-accomplishments-considering-additional-staff-new/ OTTUMWA — Jay Wheaton seemed a bit proud of how far Ottumwa Regional Airport has come since the City of Ottumwa claimed ownership in March 2021. “Everyone was unsure how it was going to be and whether we were going to be profitable or not,” Wheaton, the airport facilities manager, told the city council on […]]]>

OTTUMWA — Jay Wheaton seemed a bit proud of how far Ottumwa Regional Airport has come since the City of Ottumwa claimed ownership in March 2021.

“Everyone was unsure how it was going to be and whether we were going to be profitable or not,” Wheaton, the airport facilities manager, told the city council on Tuesday. “I think we’ve really turned it around.”

Indeed, not only does the airport make a profit, but it will reorganize tasks and perhaps add employees later.

The council unanimously passed a restructuring of airport staff, creating the position of “airport services supervisor”, who would both perform aircraft maintenance and be able to give flight instructions.

The change was made because the airport has been able to make a profit since the city took it over. Revenue has increased by approximately $80,000 and continues to rise as the airport sells thousands of gallons of cheaper fuel that cannot be found on any of the coasts and is in a convenient location in the Midwest.

Wheaton pointed out in a presentation that over the past two years when the airport was run by ArchAngel, 217,301 gallons of fuel were sold. Since the city took over as operator less than two years ago, approximately 306,000 gallons have been sold.

Additionally, the airport added new contracts, and Wheaton said one of its biggest fuel customers will be purchasing a larger aircraft in the near future.

Wheaton said the number of stopovers at the airport has increased.

“August 1 was the busiest day we’ve ever had with 38 return flights in one day,” he said. “Now some of that is Indian Hills students, but that’s still a lot of activity for a local airport.”

The airport is now designated as an “enhanced service” airport, one step below “commercial service”. As an enhanced service airport, it can accommodate most types of business aircraft, sell fuel, maintain aircraft, and more.

Mayor Rick Johnson told Wheaton he hopes one day the airport can also be used for commercial flights, like the Southeast Iowa Regional Airport in Burlington.

“I’m still hoping we can explore that at some point on a day-to-day basis,” Johnson said. “Other cities in Iowa of comparable size have it, and I don’t know why we can’t.

“So I’ll be more than happy to help you with that at some point,” the mayor chuckled.

In a sense, the airport is booked. He currently has a waiting list of 15 students for flight instruction and 31 different pilots have used the rental aircraft.

However, some board members questioned the hiring of an airport services supervisor. An extended portion of this restructuring could be used by an airport secretary to take calls to ensure business remains at Ottumwa, but much will depend on the health of the airport fund balance at the future ; the airport fund is separate from any other city fund.

The airport services supervisor will earn $83,262 a year, but the city is also awaiting the results of a Gallagher salary and benefits study, which is due early next year, to see if he should. be a salary adjustment.

Human resources director Barbara Codjoe said market research of national averages for the position was done, as was a conversation with operations manager Duke Ball, to get a ballpark figure for the salary.

“I’m not against it, but if we’re looking at creating new positions, why don’t we just make the (salary) adjustment now rather than make a second adjustment at some point?” council member Marc Roe asked Codjoe.

Codjoe said it comes down to knowing what the job responsibilities of airport employees are, so parameters will be set for those job descriptions.

“We need to be able to account for what they’re doing because it’s not being done right now,” she said. “We haven’t considered that for a year and a half since we took matters into our own hands.”

The board-approved restructuring will cost less than $20,000 of the airport fund. However, this expense increases as the number of employees hired increases, especially full-time employees. For example, adding a part-time secretary would cost approximately $25,000 more than the approved restructuring. Adding a single full-time secretary to what has already been approved will increase this expense to approximately $78,000.

“I understand that we increased sales because that’s exactly what we wanted to happen,” Roe said. “So increasing salaries, even if we increase sales, is going to knock that fund balance down pretty quickly.

“So before we add a lot of positions, I would like to see a solid plan on how we intend to increase revenue or reduce expenses in other areas. That way we can ensure that we keep our fund balance healthy.”

As for the airport’s potential, Wheaton was excited about what might be in store. In June, the airport will be one of the stops for the Air Race Classic, a one-day event that will feature 50 aircraft and a minimum of 100 female pilots.

In addition, there are 530 acres of farmland that will be tendered next fall.

“We have all of these properties there, and we’ve had a lot of calls from people about when we’re going to bid again. As high as soybeans and corn are right now, we’re looking for that land value to go up a bit. “Wheaton said. “We have the leases from MUSCO Lighting and the FAA. Things are pretty busy there. It’s more than just an airport.”

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Mehran Karimi Nasseri, who lived at Paris airport and inspired ‘The Terminal’, has died https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/mehran-karimi-nasseri-who-lived-at-paris-airport-and-inspired-the-terminal-has-died/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 21:03:00 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/mehran-karimi-nasseri-who-lived-at-paris-airport-and-inspired-the-terminal-has-died/ Comment this story Comment The 77-year-old Iranian refugee whose ordeal inspired the 2004 film “The Terminal” died on Saturday inside Paris Charles de Gaulle airport, where he had previously lived for 18 years. Mehran Karimi Nasseri died around noon local time of a heart attack, a Paris airport spokesman said on Sunday. “He was an […]]]>

Comment

The 77-year-old Iranian refugee whose ordeal inspired the 2004 film “The Terminal” died on Saturday inside Paris Charles de Gaulle airport, where he had previously lived for 18 years.

Mehran Karimi Nasseri died around noon local time of a heart attack, a Paris airport spokesman said on Sunday. “He was an iconic and charismatic character. There is a lot of emotion at the airport following his death.

Nasseri was loved by airport staff, who mourned his passing over the weekend, the spokesman said.

The 2004 Steven Spielberg film, set at JFK International Airport in New York, starred Tom Hanks as an Eastern European man stuck in the transit area after a coup in his fictional home country upsets his legal status. At the end, the protagonist leaves the airport, briefly fulfills his father’s mission and then returns home.

‘Terminal’: Cleared for takeoff

But Nasseri’s decades-long immigration struggles were far more complicated. Over the years, he’s provided conflicting details about his life, but in the end, there was no Hollywood ending.

Nasseri was exiled or fled political unrest in Iran in the 1970s and settled in Belgium for many years. He was reportedly determined to find his British mother and tried to travel elsewhere in Europe, before being repeatedly deported from several countries for not having the required immigration documents, according to the BBC.

In 1988, French authorities arrested him at Paris airport as he tried to cross without identity papers, which he said had been stolen. The authorities held him for several days in limbo in a transit area, then released him in one of Charles de Gaulle’s terminals.

Trapped by immigration, he quickly moved into makeshift accommodation at the airport and lived for many years in Terminal 1.

They dream of reaching America. Their forced service in the Iranian Revolutionary Guards locks them out.

He became the subject of news articles and at least two films. His airport home became a media sensation after the 2004 release of “The Terminal.” Dream works reportedly paid him several hundred thousand dollars for the rights to his story.

In 1999, France offered him a residence permit. But he continued to live inside the airport until 2006. After leaving the airport, he seemed to have trouble adjusting to life outside.

“The reality is that he had psychological issues,” the airport spokesman said. “He was a homeless person who was being cared for by the airport community and doctors.”

The spokesman said Nasseri returned to the airport’s Terminal 2F in mid-September, after leaving a nursing home where he was staying.

“Many people went to great lengths to have him hospitalized and placed in a retirement home suitable for his needs,” the spokesperson said.

Other refugees have found themselves in similar situations, although none for so long.

In 2018, a Syrian man lived in a Malaysian airport for seven months before Canada took him in. He was caught without legal accommodation when he could not return home to his war-torn country.

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Climate scientists protest private jets at Charlotte airport https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/climate-scientists-protest-private-jets-at-charlotte-airport/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 22:31:00 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/climate-scientists-protest-private-jets-at-charlotte-airport/ As world leaders discuss climate change at the United Nations summit in Egypt, activists elsewhere are targeting private jets and frequent flyers, which contribute to global warming. On Thursday, four people, including two climatologists, were charged with trespassing after chaining themselves to the entrances to the private jet terminal at Charlotte Douglas International Airport. It […]]]>

As world leaders discuss climate change at the United Nations summit in Egypt, activists elsewhere are targeting private jets and frequent flyers, which contribute to global warming. On Thursday, four people, including two climatologists, were charged with trespassing after chaining themselves to the entrances to the private jet terminal at Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

It was one of a series of protests at 17 airports around the world coordinated by a group called Scientist Rebellion.

Peter Kalmus of Chapel Hill studies biodiversity and ecological predictions for NASA. Rose Abramoff of Knoxville, Tennessee studies how climate change affects ecosystems. She doesn’t want to say where.

They are also both activists, who have recently turned to civil disobedience. Abramoff says she struggles to keep her work and activism separate:

“Like all scientists, we have been trained to maintain a kind of neutrality in all things, especially when we speak in public. As scientists, none of us claim to represent our institutions. place more credible because of our background, and because of our background in climate science,” Abramoff said.

“But when we engage in advocacy, we are citizens, you know, we are mothers and daughters, fathers and sons and members of our community. And we have the right to say what we think, and almost a liability,” Abramoff said.

Rose Abramoff (left) and an Indigenous activist named Dakota chained themselves to the front gate of the private jet terminal at Charlotte Airport on Thursday.

Thursday’s incident began around 9:30 a.m. at the airport’s Wilson Air Center for private jets, which is across from the main terminal. Abramoff and Kalmus joined two other activists – Deborah Kushner from Virginia and an indigenous activist from Florida, named Dakota.

Abramoff and Dakota locked in and glued to a sliding door that leads to the runway. Kushner and Kalmus chained themselves to the terminal’s main gate.

“Quite quickly, maybe after five minutes, about 20 police showed up. And they asked us to leave,” Kalmus said. “A few of us were actually glued to surfaces. The other two of us were chained up and we didn’t have the keys. they arrested us all.”

Chained up, they did interviews and posted on social media, calling for a ban on private jets and a tax on frequent flyers.

“I feel hopeless”

For Kalmus and Abramoff, it was the second time this year that they were at risk of arrest during a climate protest. Kalmus was arrested on April 6 after he and other protesters chained themselves to the door of a JP Morgan Chase bank building in Los Angeles, where he was living at the time.

“This action has gone quite viral, and I think it’s raised a lot of awareness that JPMorgan Chase is the institution on our planet doing the most to fund new fossil fuel projects,” Kalmus said.

That same day, Abramoff was also arrested while she chained herself to the White House fence in Washington, DC.

“We were asking the administration to declare a climate emergency, which is still ongoing, although some aspects of those demands from this group have been somewhat met by the government. You know, we passed landmark climate legislation and mobilized defense production Take action. So, you know, there’s a lot of things to be optimistic about. But much, much more should be done to keep our planet safe and habitable,” Abramoff said.

In addition to risking being arrested for civil disobedience, the two activists sometimes fear mixing their passions and careers.

“An analogy made by another activist is that being an environmentalist in 2022 is like being an academic at the Library of Alexandria while it burns. At some point you have to put the books down and pick up a spear at fire,” she said. .

Kalmus hasn’t suffered any repercussions from his work as a government scientist, but he’s also worried about it. When he does interviews like this, he is careful to say that he only speaks for himself. But he still worries.

“The first action on April 6, I thought there was a very, very good chance that I would be fired,” Kalmus said. “It’s just very weird that I have to do this, that it’s come to this point. But I feel responsible to do everything I can to raise awareness. I feel hopeless. I want to do this for the planet, and for my children and for young people is, frankly, more important than being safe in my career, so I do everything I can not to jeopardize my work. But sometimes, there are, you know, a higher calling.”

The four protesters at the airport were taken to Mecklenburg County Jail and charged with trespassing. Kalmus says he has a court date in December.

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Boeing 717 returns to Delta Airlines service at Tri-Cities Airport | WJHL https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/boeing-717-returns-to-delta-airlines-service-at-tri-cities-airport-wjhl/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 22:55:07 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/boeing-717-returns-to-delta-airlines-service-at-tri-cities-airport-wjhl/ BLOUNTVILLE, Tenn. (WJHL) — For the first time in nearly three years, Delta Airlines at Tri-Cities Airport will restore mainline service. On Wednesday evening, a Boeing 717 will fly into the Tri-Cities from Atlanta, Georgia. He will leave Thursday morning. This will be the first time there has been a flight on Delta’s mainline since […]]]>

BLOUNTVILLE, Tenn. (WJHL) — For the first time in nearly three years, Delta Airlines at Tri-Cities Airport will restore mainline service.

On Wednesday evening, a Boeing 717 will fly into the Tri-Cities from Atlanta, Georgia. He will leave Thursday morning. This will be the first time there has been a flight on Delta’s mainline since 2020.

The plane is larger than the CRJ plane that takes off daily from the airport, which means more passengers can fly.

Tri-Cities Airport Executive Director Gene Cossey said it was scheduled until Jan. 1, but he hopes to see it stay.

“All that means is that it’s on the schedule until January 1st. They could continue it after that, they could make it come and go. We hope that continues, but for now we know he will be here every night and leaving every morning until January 1,” Cossey said.

The plane has more capacity, more first-class seats and simply offers better overall passenger service, according to Cossey. The 717 will fly once a day. The plane is scheduled to fly from the Tri-Cities to Atlanta at 6:10 a.m. Thursday morning.

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Los Angeles City Council wants report on frequent charter planes at Van Nuys airport – Daily News https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/los-angeles-city-council-wants-report-on-frequent-charter-planes-at-van-nuys-airport-daily-news/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 13:45:13 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/los-angeles-city-council-wants-report-on-frequent-charter-planes-at-van-nuys-airport-daily-news/ The Los Angeles City Council has asked Los Angeles World Airports, which operates Van Nuys Airport, and the city attorney to report to the council on steps it could take to deal with a growth in charter flights , in response to complaints from West San Fernando Valley residents. fed up with worsening noise and […]]]>

The Los Angeles City Council has asked Los Angeles World Airports, which operates Van Nuys Airport, and the city attorney to report to the council on steps it could take to deal with a growth in charter flights , in response to complaints from West San Fernando Valley residents. fed up with worsening noise and air pollution, especially since the start of the pandemic.

The city council has requested an analysis of existing regulations regarding charter flights and recommendations for working with lawmakers to address community members’ concerns.

According to a motion the board approved 10-0 on Friday November 4th. The motion also called for analysis of current charter regulations.

In written comments, some residents said Van Nuys Airport was supposed to be a small general aviation airport, but has essentially turned into a commercial airport because people can book charter flights from installation.

“Seats on charter flights are being sold to the public, which was never the intention,” resident Robin Munushian wrote. “This was done behind the backs of the residents who have to endure the constant fumes and hammering of the plane 24/7. Not only are the residents forced to endure the barrage of planes, the noise and broadcasts, but we are not allowed to sleep.

Council did not discuss the issue before voting, but received 20 written comments from residents affected by the increase in charter flight activity. A few people spoke during the public comments before the vote.

One caller, who did not provide his name, called the motion a “vital first step” but said more needed to be done. A few callers have asked the board to adopt a moratorium on Van Nuys airport expansion pending a review of leases they say were approved without the required community input.

Others called for an increase in user fees from flight operators or said the wealthy 1% who can afford private jets or charter flights – which include celebrities – take off or land at Van airport. Nuys while nearby residents have to deal with the negative impacts.

“The exhaust smell is so bad now,” said a caller who did not give his name. ” I am asthmatic. I can’t even stay outside for more than three or four minutes.

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Silver Line gives Metro and Dulles Airport optimism for new passengers https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/silver-line-gives-metro-and-dulles-airport-optimism-for-new-passengers/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 02:46:00 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/silver-line-gives-metro-and-dulles-airport-optimism-for-new-passengers/ Comment this story Comment The black tape covering the signs at Dulles International Airport that point to its new subway station was removed this week as workers complete their final tasks to open the long-awaited Silver Line extension in less than two weeks . A giant banner announcing the train stop has been placed in […]]]>

Comment

The black tape covering the signs at Dulles International Airport that point to its new subway station was removed this week as workers complete their final tasks to open the long-awaited Silver Line extension in less than two weeks .

A giant banner announcing the train stop has been placed in a busy spot that passengers will see when walking between the metro station and the airport terminals: “No buses, no fuss, one-stop train service between Dulles International Airport and Washington DC”. said. “Welcome aboard.”

Officials from the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, which operates Dulles and oversaw construction of the $3 billion extension, and Metro, the agency that will operate the Silver Line, held a tour of the 11-billion extension on Wednesday. .5 miles through Northern Virginia. It will begin carrying customers on November 15, a manufacturing milestone that is four years behind schedule. The visit came a day after the transit agency’s first full day of increased fare evasion enforcement, which resulted in five citations after years of Metro mostly ignoring the infraction.

Metro is expected to open six stations in Northern Virginia, including a stop at Washington Dulles International Airport on Nov. 15. (Video: Justin George, Amber Ferguson/The Washington Post)

Metro and the airport authority see the Silver Line as a significant boost to regional rail and air travel, which has faced pandemic-related issues and staffing shortages. While airline passenger numbers have mostly rebounded as some carriers report record revenues, transit agencies like Metro have lost thousands of fare-paying passengers as part of the shift to working from home. Subway executives are hoping their rebound will follow, pinning hopes on the Silver Line and sending more suspended cars back.

“It’s been a generational dream long before I took this job,” Metro chief executive Randy Clarke said Wednesday, about three months into the job, “and we really look forward to welcoming people. “

Clarke said he expects steady growth in ridership on Metrorail from residents moving into apartment towers and condominium complexes along the Tech Corridor, and did not express a concern. concern that remote working policies could curb use of a rail line built with expectations of trains full of office workers commuting five days a week. Commuters who are part of changing travel patterns that have emerged since the pandemic will still rely on the subway, Clarke said.

Silver Line extension to open Nov. 15 in time for Thanksgiving trip

As he stood on the platform at Dulles Station overlooking the airport terminal, he described the airport as the central destination for passengers along the extension. He also said people living in developments like Loudoun Station, where hundreds of new homes have been built, will rely on Ashburn Station to get to shops, events and workplaces at Tysons. and elsewhere.

“It’s not just going to help people today. Future growth along this corridor is going to be amazing to see coming together,” Clarke said. “And everything is based, as usual, around this region: where Metro is, where people want to live, work and play.”

Outside Ashburn station, the future final stop of the Silver Line, on Wednesday workers were still smoothing the concrete that forms a walkway to the Loudoun station development and shops and cinema near. The catwalks featured gleaming white ceilings while the roof of the new station featured a pattern of grey, white, and clear glass panels evoking the Brutalist architecture and ceilings of old subway stations.

On a drive from Ashburn to Dulles, trees with red, yellow and green leaves on undeveloped land stood next to huge tech warehouses and office complexes. The platform at Dulles Station provided an unobstructed view of the airport terminal while the interior walkway between the terminal and the station featured new signs directing passengers to baggage claim. A subway video announcing the opening date of the Silver Line played repeatedly on a television screen.

John E. ‘Jack’ Potter, chief executive of the airport authority, said Dulles expects ‘high’ usage of ‘several thousand’ passengers a day via the subway station, which is five minutes away walk from baggage claim via an underground corridor.

During baggage claim, Sophia Sevilla, 20, of Baltimore, who had just returned from Miami, said she was unaware of the upcoming opening of the new station, but said it would be a welcome convenience.

“That would be really convenient because a lot of people don’t want to waste like $50 on an Uber and gas is super expensive,” she said.

The new Silver Line riders are part of Metro’s strategy to tackle a nearly $150 million funding shortfall it will face next year amid sharp declines in fare revenue and shrinking federal revenues. coronavirus assistance. Another strategy is to reduce the number of non-paying passengers on the rail and bus systems – a problem that has worsened since the start of the pandemic, but which was largely ignored until Tuesday, when police subway began to strengthen law enforcement.

During the first full day of renewed enforcement, transit police issued five citations for nonpayment of fares, officials said.

The transit agency estimates it is losing more than $40 million a year in direct fare revenue, while also worrying that frequent evasion violations are driving away paying passengers. Past enforcement tactics have come under fire from some black residents in the district, who say police targeted stations disproportionately used by black passengers, making unnecessary stops and using excessive force for minor incidents. In 2018, the DC Council decriminalized the offense, making it punishable only by fines.

Metro assesses fare increase and rail improvements while preparing for Silver Line

While enforcement continued in Maryland and Virginia, the number of citations issued in both states has dropped precipitously in recent years.

Of the five citations issued on Tuesday, four were in the Pentagon City neighborhood of Arlington and one was at the Morgan Boulevard station in Prince George’s County. Officers also issued 18 warnings, Metro spokeswoman Sherri Ly said. Clarke said Transit Policing is not about issuing tickets, but about warning and informing violators.

Police also made two arrests for trespassing, at District’s Gallery Place station and Pentagon City, according to Transit Police records. Further details were not immediately available Wednesday.

Ly said the presence of officers working in Pentagon City deterred “a number” of people from jumping the tariff barriers.

“We continue to provide enforcement in the normal course of our duties and with high visibility at various stations across the system,” Ly said in a statement.

As train shortage eases, subway and bus systems gear up for Silver Line

As the transit system steps up enforcement, it simultaneously increases train frequency as Metro begins a phased return of its overhead railcar series after suffering a year-long shortage.

Metro is slowly putting back its 7000 series cars after the rail system regulator suspended them following a wheel safety issue discovered in several cars. The Washington Metrorail Safety Commission has allowed Metro to slowly reincorporate more cars that receive inspections every four days.

The safety commission last week cleared Metro to reinstate hundreds of additional railcars and gave Metro benchmarks in the coming months that would allow the transit agency to reinstate its entire suspended fleet. Clarke said Metro is focusing first on rolling out those trains to six stations reopening Sunday south of Reagan National Airport that have been closed for weeks.

Metro officials have estimated that trains on the new Silver Line extension will run every 15 minutes.

Crews continue to work through a list of minor tasks to receive safety certification from the safety commission, Clarke said. Information technology workers acquire software while signaling circuits still need fine-tuning. The agency also resolves wiring issues that cause inconsistencies with emergency lighting. The safety commission said Metro could not operate the Silver Line without the certification.

Clarke said the two agencies are working together to ensure the new line is certified by Nov. 15.

“The team is fully confident that we will have finished them,” he said. “Everyone does the same thing. We want the most secure and reliable system there is.

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Vintage airplanes take off from downtown Greenville Airport https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/vintage-airplanes-take-off-from-downtown-greenville-airport/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 02:33:00 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/vintage-airplanes-take-off-from-downtown-greenville-airport/ GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) – It was a chance to step back in time at the Greenville Downtown Airport over the weekend. “The romance and charm of vintage warbirds and aircraft obviously surpasses anything produced today,” said Warbird Adventures Chief Instructor Thom Richard. Warbird Adventures, a vintage aircraft flight school in Ninety Six, brought its […]]]>

GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) – It was a chance to step back in time at the Greenville Downtown Airport over the weekend.

“The romance and charm of vintage warbirds and aircraft obviously surpasses anything produced today,” said Warbird Adventures Chief Instructor Thom Richard.

Warbird Adventures, a vintage aircraft flight school in Ninety Six, brought its fleet of six planes to the airport, from the T-6 Texan to the P-40 Warhawk American Dream.

“Bringing aviation to the community, we love aviation. We live it every day and bringing in these historic planes, just so people can see them and potentially fly is a wonderful thing for us,” explained the director of public relations for the downtown Greenville airport, Robert Hoover.

Warbird Adventures teaches people how to fly WWII planes.

“It’s a beautiful thing. My dad was in the military, so that’s a connection I have with them,” said Mark, who came to see the planes on Sunday.

“It evokes a lot of emotion and excitement in people and it’s just fantastic to see little kids running up to the planes and laughing out loud because they’re so excited,” says Richard. “Same thing with adults, when they fly in one they swear up and down it’s the greatest thing they’ve ever done.”

Nicknamed the “Pilot Maker”, the T-6 Texan is what WWII fighter pilots trained on before going into battle. The plane was designed about 90 years ago. Even though the technology has changed a lot since then, it is still used to inspire future pilots.

“There is always this interest, always. I would love to be in one of those helicopters or a plane. That would be awesome,” Mark said.

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Forsyth Commissioners approve an “uncertain” solution for the erosion problem near Smith Reynolds Airport in east Winston-Salem. https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/forsyth-commissioners-approve-an-uncertain-solution-for-the-erosion-problem-near-smith-reynolds-airport-in-east-winston-salem/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://viventingonlinemarketing.com/forsyth-commissioners-approve-an-uncertain-solution-for-the-erosion-problem-near-smith-reynolds-airport-in-east-winston-salem/ Despite opposition from critics who say it is an uncertain solution that will take too long to complete if approved, Smith Reynolds Airport will seek a state grant to cover the bulk of the Stabilization costs for a section of Brushy Fork Creek where extreme erosion has eaten away at the property. in an adjacent […]]]>

Despite opposition from critics who say it is an uncertain solution that will take too long to complete if approved, Smith Reynolds Airport will seek a state grant to cover the bulk of the Stabilization costs for a section of Brushy Fork Creek where extreme erosion has eaten away at the property. in an adjacent neighborhood.

On Thursday, Forsyth County commissioners unanimously approved a request from airport manager Mark Davidson to apply for a $320,000 grant for the project from the North Carolina Land and Water Fund. The county would pay $80,000 for work to shore up a section of Brushy Fork behind the houses on Barkwood Drive.

The proposed solution has frustrated conservationists who cited what they saw as a lack of urgency to fix neighbors’ problems and compensate them for the thousands of dollars they say they spent tackling the damage .

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Kenneth Nesbitt points out where Brushy Fork Creek caused severe erosion behind his Barkwood Drive home. Forsyth County has applied for a grant to help repair erosion near Smith Reynolds Airport, but activists say the county has been slow to respond to concerns about the erosion problem.


Allison Lee Isley, Diary


Yadkin Riverkeeper Edgar Miller called the county’s prospects for the competitive grant “uncertain at best,” and noted that it would be nearly a year before the winners were announced. State officials told the Journal it would likely be early 2024 before a grant-funded restoration project could begin.

“The residents of Barkwood Drive have faced these issues for over four years and deserve to have their concerns addressed now,” Miller told commissioners during the meeting’s public comment period. “With tens of millions of dollars invested in airport expansion, it would seem reasonable that the county and the airport could afford to address these concerns and reassure residents…their homes and property will not will be more damaged.”

Barkwood residents – some of whom have lived in their homes for more than 50 years – say Brushy Fork Creek began eating away at their backyards at an unprecedented rate shortly after the airport clearcut 250 acres of trees behind their homes in 2015. Water toppled trees, destroyed fences, damaged outbuildings and opened up sinkholes.

“Not my intention to offend”The Journal’s questions about erosion and tree-cutting permits led to scrutiny in June by the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality, which advised the airport to take action necessary to control runoff from the deforested area.

Davidson said he decided to apply for the grant after learning about erosion issues through Journal reporting.

However, while backing the grant request on Thursday, the airport manager and some commissioners pushed back against the claim that the tree-cutting project was responsible for harm to Barkwood residents.

“We don’t know for sure if we’ve contributed to the erosion, but we’re here to help,” Davidson said.

Commissioner Richard Linville said he visited the site on Tuesday to get a first-hand look. When asked Thursday if he would conclude that the airport was responsible for the erosion of the creek, he replied: “No, I wouldn’t.”

“It’s not my intention to offend or argue with anyone, I’m just telling you what I saw,” Linville added, while noting that the clearing was done with the approval of the North Carolina Forest Service and that trees near the creek were left in place.

But several experts told the Journal that the tree removal likely led to increased runoff that has eaten away at the banks of a creek that residents say they once could easily cross with one step.

And questions remain about the level of environmental monitoring of the project.

The Forest Service told the Journal that the agency ended its role and revoked an agricultural exemption that allowed the project to proceed without a standard erosion and sediment control plan when it learned that the felling trees was underway for the expansion of the airport.

North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality officials said it was unclear whether DEQ had assumed oversight of the site at the time. However, DEQ identified erosion issues when inspecting the area in June.

Engineering students from Wake Forest University are studying the site as part of a high-level design project to determine how stream erosion is related to tree loss, Courtney Di said. Vittorio, a WFU professor specializing in water management.

While conceding that public funds are not a sure thing, Linville said the county may consider other sources of funding if the grant is not approved. This decision will not come until December 2023, confirmed Davidson, the airport manager, at the request of commissioner Don Martin.

“Wow,” Martin replied. “It’s a long time.”

John Deem covers climate change and the environment in the Triad and Northwestern North Carolina. Her work is supported by a grant from the 1Earth Fund and the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation.

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